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PNS Daily Newscast - July 18, 2018 


Trump now says he misspoke as he stood side-by-side with Putin. Also on the Wednesday rundown: A Senate committee looks at the latest attempt to weaken the Endangered Species Act; and public input is being sought on Great Lakes restoration.

Daily Newscasts

Preserving Wilderness for Future Generations

June 10, 2010

(Corrected version. The legislation does not allow road-building as indicated in the previous copy. Sorry for any inconvenience.)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Conservation groups are praising the action of Tennessee Senators Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker. They introduced legislation this week that would set aside large swaths of undeveloped land in the Cherokee National Forest. The bill would protect just under 20,000 acres total. It's been more than 25 years since Tennessee wilderness has been placed under new Federal protection.

Jeff Hunter, Tennessee Wild field organizer, supports the legislation, which he says would expand five existing areas and set aside one new area.

"Wilderness is the highest form of protection for our public lands. So, it's wonderful that Senator Alexander is introducing this legislation to protect parts of the Cherokee National forest in perpetuity; forever."

Hunter says one section of land in Monroe County is almost completely untouched by human hands.

"It's an absolutely incredible area, including pristine streams, amazing horse trails and hiking trails, and wildlife opportunities to hunt, fish for native trout. It's really spectacular."

For a copy of the bill as well as maps and descriptions of each area, visit www.tnwild.org.

Members of the coalition include Southern Appalachian Forest Coalition, Southern Environmental Law Center, Tennessee Citizens for Wilderness Planning, Cherokee Forest Voices, The Wilderness Society, Campaign for America's Wilderness of the Pew Environment Group, Smoky Mountains Hiking Club and the Tennessee chapter of the Sierra Club.

Randy O'Brien, Public News Service - TN