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PNS Daily Newscast - November 25, 2020 


Feeding hungry families, on Thanksgiving and beyond; and is that turkey really from a family farm? (Note to Broadcasters: The newscast has been granted a holiday for Thanksgiving, but we'll return first thing Friday.)


2020Talks - November 24, 2020 


Formal transition to Biden presidency begins; key Biden Cabinet nominations to be announced today. *2020Talks will not be released 11/26 & 11/27*

Groundbreaking Progress in Helping MS Patients

January 19, 2011

CHARLOTTE, N. C. - Researchers appear to be making headway in their search for ways to repair the nervous system damage caused by such neurological diseases as multiple sclerosis (MS). The University of Cambridge is one institution at which scientists say they have found a molecule that can stimulate repair of the nervous system.

The research is funded by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, where Linda Gallehugh, the Mid-Atlantic Chapter's vice president of programs, says progress is being made.

"The pharmaceutical companies have made great strides in coming up with new therapies and researchers are better understanding MS every day."

Information about the study is online at www.nationalmssociety.org. It will be published in an upcoming edition of Nature Neuroscience magazine, according to Gallehugh.

MS occurs when the body mistakenly attacks nerves around the brain and spinal cord. This causes a disruption in the flow of information along the nerves, leading to chronic, unpredictable symptoms that range from numbness and tingling, to blindness and paralysis. Gallehugh says the condition affects 400,000 Americans, with another newly diagnosed every hour. She also believes finding a cure in our lifetimes is possible.

"It is not going to happen in the next two or three years, but all of this research feeds into that goal of coming up with a cure for MS."

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society also funds research to help alleviate the symptoms of MS so patients can lead more productive lives, as well as offering information and support to people living with the disease and their families.

Stephanie Carroll Carson, Public News Service - NC