PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 25, 2020 


Democrats reported to be preparing a smaller pandemic relief package; vote-by-mail awaits a court decision in Montana.


2020Talks - September 25, 2020 


Senators respond to President Donald Trump's refusal to commit to a peaceful transfer of power. And, former military and national security officials endorse Joe Biden.

Put on the Blue Jeans and Help Fight Breast Cancer

PHOTO: Breast cancer survivor Debbie and family. PHOTO CREDIT: James Meierotto.
PHOTO: Breast cancer survivor Debbie and family. PHOTO CREDIT: James Meierotto.
September 10, 2012

ST. PAUL, Minn. - Minnesotans can get a bit casual at the office next month as part of a national fundraiser for the fight against breast cancer. The effort, Lee National Denim Day, has workers paying $5 or more to be able to wear jeans one day on the job.

Laurie Rappa, who handles corporate relations for the American Cancer Society, says that if you want to get some people together and take part, go to the website Denimday.com.

"You can register a team, and when you do that, you will receive a tool kit, a step-by-step guide, a poster, donation forms and envelopes, and some pink ribbon pins that you can use."

Since its inception in 1996, Lee National Denim Day participants have raised more than $86 million for the battle.

Rappa says the goal for this October is $3.5 million.

"And the proceeds this year are all benefiting the American Cancer Society and going to support breast cancer research, as well as community-based screening programs, along with lodging services provided by the American Cancer Society."

Rappa says those funds that go to breast cancer research are going to good use, as evidenced by the drop in the figure for mortality.

"In the last two decades the death rate from breast cancer has declined 32 percent. So we have one-third more women surviving breast cancer today then we did 20 years ago."

One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime.

More information is at denimday.com.

John Michaelson, Public News Service - MN