Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 24 


The ground rules seem to have been set concerning the sexual assault allegations against nominee Brett Kavenaugh. Also on the Monday rundown: we will take you to a state where more than 60 thousand kids are chronically absent; plus the rural digital divide a two-fold problem for Kentucky.

Daily Newscasts

Grizzly Bear Bulk-Up Season Under Way

PHOTO: Adult grizzly bear caught on a remote wildlife camera, headed for a backyard apple tree in Western Montana. Courtesy of Bob Muth.
PHOTO: Adult grizzly bear caught on a remote wildlife camera, headed for a backyard apple tree in Western Montana. Courtesy of Bob Muth.
October 25, 2012

JACKSON, Wyo. - The to-do list for grizzly bears in Wyoming: eat, eat, eat. The bears are in hyperphagia, bulking up to prepare for hibernation. They'll eat just about anything - whether it's nuts and berries or someone's backyard chickens and fruit trees. Increased bear activity has resulted in more requests for information about bear-proof fencing.

Defenders of Wildlife has been experimenting with programs to help property owners pay for fencing projects, and there's a waiting list. Erin Edge, Rocky Mountain region associate at Defenders of Wildlife, says they hope to expand.

"People want to see the bears out there, but they don't necessarily want them in their yard breaking up their fruit trees, killing their chickens, dumping over their garbage cans."

Guidelines for bear fencing, Edge says, are available free of charge at www.LWWF.org.

Edge says electrified fencing is a quick lesson for a bear, even a hungry one.

"When it's set up correctly, with the right amount of joule ratings, then you can pretty much eliminate your problem."

She says fencing protects bears as well as property. Bears that tangle with backyard livestock, trash or pets are usually relocated or killed.

Bear-proof fencing assistance forms can be found at www.defenders.org.

Deborah Courson Smith/Deb Courson Smith, Public News Service - WY