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Recycling a Holiday Leftover: Cooking Oil

PHOTO: It's been a week since the big Thanksgiving meal, and there may still be a holiday leftover lingering: cooking oil that can now be recycled. Image by: Ramon Gonzalez
PHOTO: It's been a week since the big Thanksgiving meal, and there may still be a holiday leftover lingering: cooking oil that can now be recycled. Image by: Ramon Gonzalez
November 29, 2012

DES MOINES, Iowa - Along with all the turkey remaining after holiday meals, there is another leftover that can be hard to get rid of: cooking oil. Usually, it ends up going down the drain - but recycling is a new option.

Metro Waste Authority now accepts cooking oil at its Metro Hazardous Waste Drop-Off. Reo Menning with Metro Waste Authority says they have partnered with Mid-Iowa Renewables, which already recycles cooking oil from businesses.

"This is an option for residents that has not been around before. We can help them get rid of their cooking oil, rather than putting it down their garbage disposals or their sinks."

Another option to unload used cooking oil may be as close as your local oil-change business, she says.

"Basically, where you get your oil changed, they will take it and recycle it with the vehicle oil they have. Give them a call and see if that's an option for you."

Menning says the drop-off is free. All canola, peanut and vegetable oils are accepted, and the oil collected is reused to support the local biodiesel industry.

Richard Alan, Public News Service - IA