Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 15, 2018 


Lawyer Michael Avenatti arrested on a domestic violence charge. Also on the Thursday rundown: More testimony on Ohio's "anti-protest" bill; and we'll take you to the Dakotas to celebrate American Education Week.

Daily Newscasts

AZ Border Groups Say “Gang of Eight” Bill Promising

PHOTO: The U.S. Senate immigration reform bill would spend an additional five billion dollars on security along the border with Mexico. CREDIT: Matt Clark, Defenders of Wildlife.
PHOTO: The U.S. Senate immigration reform bill would spend an additional five billion dollars on security along the border with Mexico. CREDIT: Matt Clark, Defenders of Wildlife.
April 19, 2013

PHOENIX – Immigrant rights advocates in Arizona say there's a lot to like about the so-called Gang of Eight immigration reform proposal, but also several areas for concern.

Tucson immigration attorney Mo Goldman calls the measure "a breath of fresh air" after years of frustration over the lack of action by Congress.

Goldman likes the bill's DREAM Act and legalization components, along with the possibility of a guest worker program. But he's concerned about the impact of billions of dollars earmarked for security along Arizona's southern border.

"The Tucson sector is essentially ground zero for their border security proposal,” he says. “And so obviously, there's some concern about the increased militarization on the border."

However, Goldman acknowledges that the reform measure isn't likely to get far in the U.S. House of Representatives without a border security component as well as a national mandate for employers to use the E-Verify system to check applicants.

The bill provides for a 10-year period of provisional resident status, followed by a green card for three years and eventually an opportunity for naturalization.

Mike Wilson, policy director of Border Action Network, calls the pathway to citizenship the "crown jewel" of the plan, allowing 11 million undocumented residents to come out of the shadows.

"To come out of the shadows of living in fear and living in a state of hopelessness, not knowing if they can be deported at any time,” he says. “So, it provides legal protection for those people."

Young adult immigrant Josue Saldivar says the lack of immigration reform has meant struggles for his family in Arizona, from a lack of drivers’ licenses to paying out-of-state tuition.

He says he’s glad the nation is finally having the discussions he hopes will bring his family relief. But he says the proposed bill has fairness problems in how it treats different members of the same family.

"As a DREAMer myself, I know that I will be able to get citizenship within five years,” he says. “But we talk about having a fair and just immigration system, and my parents will have to wait for 13 years."

The first Senate hearing on the bill is scheduled for today.


Doug Ramsey, Public News Service - AZ