PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 11, 2021 


We reflect and update as HIV/AIDS first came to national attention 40 years ago this month; and when it comes to infrastructure spending, bipartisanship isn't dead yet.


2021Talks - June 11, 2021 


President Biden offers up more COVID-19 vaccines to the world; Dems and GOP close in on an infrastructure deal; and Speaker Pelosi tries to quell a spat over the Middle East among Democrats.

Opposition Grows Regarding Executions and Repeal of the Racial Justice Act

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

 By Stephanie Carroll CarsonContact
May 23, 2013

RALEIGH, N.C. - North Carolina lawmakers are pushing ahead with a bill (SB 306) that would restart executions in the state and repeal the landmark Racial Justice Act (RJA). The RJA allows inmates to argue that race was a factor in their sentencing or jury selection, and if they are successful, it converts their sentence to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Randolph County attorney Jonathan Megerian said it is time for the state's citizens to speak up.

"Whenever someone is put to death by the state of North Carolina, he's being put to death in the name of the average citizen. The average the citizen needs to pay attention to that, for the same reason that the average citizen should try to be involved in all of his government's decisions."

The proposed legislation offers legal protection to doctors for performing executions. There hasn't been a execution in the state since 2006, and last year no one was sentenced to death in North Carolina. The RJA was passed in 2009 after mounting evidence that race was a factor in death row cases.

Doug Bartholomew, Charlotte, was among the many who spoke out in Raleigh at an event on Wednesday. His brother-in-law was murdered, and Bartholomew said he and his family are strongly in support of the RJA.

"I really can't understand people being against the Racial Justice Act, because what it does is say if there is racism in our system, we want to find it and we want to fix the problem," Bartholomew said.

Megerian cited instances where death row inmates are exonerated of their crime years after their sentencing. He remembered one case where his client spent 15 years on death row for a crime he did not commit.

"If we had sped that case up, not only would he be dead, but we would not have known that he wasn't guilty of what he was charged with. I'm afraid that's going to happen again if we race people to the execution chamber, Megerian said."

Since the passage of the RJA, four death row inmates have been sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Dozens of others are eligible.

Best Practices