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PNS Daily News - December 11, 2019 


U.S. House to vote on two articles of impeachment; $1.4 trillion in planned oil & gas development said to put the world in "bright red level" of climate crisis; anti-protest legislation moves forward in Ohio; "forest farming" moves forward in Appalachia; and someone's putting cowboy hats on pigeons in Nevada.

2020Talks - December 11, 2019 


18 years ago today, China joined the WTO. Now, China's in a trade war with the U.S. Also, House Democrats and the Trump administration made a deal to move forward with the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement.

Help for Ohioans who Struggle to Beat the Heat

PHOTO: The HEAP Summer Crisis Program begins today in Ohio, helping qualified, low-income residents secure cooling assistance during the hottest days of the year. Picture of a fan. Photo credit. Mary Kuhlman
PHOTO: The HEAP Summer Crisis Program begins today in Ohio, helping qualified, low-income residents secure cooling assistance during the hottest days of the year. Picture of a fan. Photo credit. Mary Kuhlman
July 1, 2013

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Temperatures are expected to climb this week, which will leave many Ohioans struggling to beat the heat. However, a helping hand can help qualified residents keep cool and safe.

Summer Blakeny with the Mahoning Youngstown Community Action Partnership said the HEAP Summer Crisis Program provides assistance for low-income households that have a family member over the age of 60 or someone in the home with a documented medical condition.

"We're probably going to have a hotter summer than we did last year, which was pretty intense, and we have our mature population who are in their homes and their blood pressure is rising or they're living with asthma. We just want to do whatever we can to help keep you healthy," Blakeny said.

The program provides a one-time benefit up to $175 toward the purchase of an air conditioner or fan, or to be put toward an electric bill. To qualify, households must have a gross annual income at or below 175 percent of federal poverty guidelines, which is about $40,000 a year for a family of four. The program starts July 1 and runs through Aug. 31.

Blakeny expressed surprise at the number of people who do not know about the program or that they can benefit from it.

"Some have had job losses, and they have a different income level than they did a couple of years ago," she said. "They didn't know this kind of assistance was available to them, based on their new situation."

The Summer Crisis Program couples well with the PIPP Plus Program, another benefit provided by the Office of Community Assistance, Blakeny added.

"Based off your monthly income, you are set on a payment program with your utility company. You're still responsible, but it is something here to make things a little bit easier for those who have more limited means than others," she said.

To apply for the Summer Crisis Program, residents need to contact their local community action agency or call the Ohio Development Services Agency consumer hotline at 1-800-282-0880.

Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - OH