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PNS Daily Newscast - November 16, 2018 


Winter Storm Avery takes lives, puts the brakes on commutes across the Northeast. Also on our Friday rundown: A first-of-its-kind report calls for policies to ease transitions of young people living in foster care. And "got gratitude" this holiday season? It could benefit your health.

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Searching for Ways to Protect IL Children from Summer Violence

Youth Guidance B.A.M. (Becoming A Man)  Sports Edition is a school-based counseling, mentoring, violence prevention and educational enrichment program that promotes social, emotional and behavioral competencies in at-risk male youth.   Courtesy: youth-guidance.org
Youth Guidance B.A.M. (Becoming A Man) Sports Edition is a school-based counseling, mentoring, violence prevention and educational enrichment program that promotes social, emotional and behavioral competencies in at-risk male youth. Courtesy: youth-guidance.org
July 8, 2013

CHICAGO - Looking for ways to protect residents, some Illinois towns, including Highland Park and Skokie, are enacting assault weapons bans before the state's concealed-carry law goes into effect.

With the CDC reporting homicide as the third-leading cause of death for young people, mayors, police chiefs and educators are also calling for more investments in out-of-school-time programs to keep kids involved in positive summer activities.

According to Kelley Talbot, assistant director of policy advocacy with Voices for Illinois Children, statewide, many young people have nowhere to go when school is out.

"Only 16 percent of Illinois' K-through-12 youth participate in after-school programs," she said. "Far too many youth don't have access to programs."

She said many of the programs continue through the summer with hands-on experiences and mentors to help kids learn to make positive choices and develop career skills.

Talbot said cities and policymakers are realizing that cutting programs for young people is not the answer.

"You know, you see schools being squeezed, you see a variety of community programs being squeezed," she declared. "You see in the past deep cuts around the state, and only recently have you seen this consensus that we need to invest."

Talbot said the state needs more programs like Chicago's "Becoming a Man" and the 44 percent reduction in arrests for violent crime among its youth.

"In addition to that 44 percent decrease in violent crime arrests, you also saw a reduction in failing grades of 37 percent and a 10 percent increase in graduation rates," she stated.

According to the CDC, 13 young people are killed every day in the U.S. and nearly 2,000 are treated daily in emergency rooms for injuries caused by violence. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder has said the nation "can't arrest its way out of this problem," and that prevention is the key to turning it around.

More information is at CDC.gov and at Voices4Kids.org.

Mary Anne Meyers, Public News Service - IL