Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 24 


Update: A second accuser emerges with misconduct allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavenaugh. Also on the Monday rundown: We take you to a state where more than 60,000 kids are chronically absent from school; and we'll let you know why the rural digital divide can be a two-fold problem.

Daily Newscasts

Issues in Farm Bill Have the Attention of Animal Advocates

PHOTO: Sows lined up in crates. An undercover HSUS investigation in spring 2012 revealed cruelty and unsanitary conditions at a Wyoming pig breeding facility owned by a pork supplier. Courtesy of HSUS.
PHOTO: Sows lined up in crates. An undercover HSUS investigation in spring 2012 revealed cruelty and unsanitary conditions at a Wyoming pig breeding facility owned by a pork supplier. Courtesy of HSUS.
July 24, 2013

AUSTIN, Texas - Animal-rights advocates are perched on the edges of their seats as members of the U.S. House and Senate evaluate legislation to replace the Farm Bill that expires in September.

Two measures that directly affect farm-animal welfare are part of the package. Both House and Senate bills include a version of the Animal Fighting Spectator Prohibition Act. Wayne Pacelle, president and chief executive of the Humane Society of the United States, explained what the act does.

"It would make it a crime to attend or to bring a child to a dog fight or a cockfight," he said.

The House version of the Farm Bill also includes an amendment by Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa. Pacelle predicted it would mean misery for many animals - including calves, pigs, chickens, puppies and even sharks - by tossing out state laws about humane treatment of animals.

"If there's a state standard that says that the animals should be able to lie down, turn around, stand up and extend their limbs, that could be nullified by Steve King's amendment," he said. "He even opposed efforts to include pets in disaster planning."

King has said he believes the wide variety of state animal-welfare laws makes it difficult for food producers to comply with them and restricts commerce. However, Pacelle said the King amendment could nullify hard-won rights for animals in 34 states and has broad implications for food safety and environmental standards.

John Michaelson, Public News Service - TX