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PNS Daily Newscast - July 18, 2018 


Trump now says he misspoke as he stood side-by-side with Putin. Also on the Wednesday rundown: A Senate committee looks at the latest attempt to weaken the Endangered Species Act; and public input is being sought on Great Lakes restoration.

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Californians Unite to Protect Drinking H20 Supply

PHOTO: Many Californians may not be aware their drinking water comes from the Colorado River. The second annual "Colorado River Day" was held Thursday to celebrate the river and send a message that demand on the river's water far exceeds its supply. Photo credit: OARS
PHOTO: Many Californians may not be aware their drinking water comes from the Colorado River. The second annual "Colorado River Day" was held Thursday to celebrate the river and send a message that demand on the river's water far exceeds its supply. Photo credit: OARS
July 26, 2013

SAN DIEGO – Californians are uniting to protect the river that provides drinking water to about 20 million people in the Southland.

The second annual Colorado River Day was held Thursday in San Diego and five other Western cities to highlight the river's continuing challenge of supply versus demand.

Megan Baehrens, executive director of San Diego Coastkeeper, says 70 to 90 percent of the region's water comes from the Colorado River.

"So, it's incumbent upon us as stewards of our own community and stewards of the Colorado River and the water we use from it, to take care of it," she said.

California has more people depending upon Colorado River water than any other state. Plus, more than a half million acres of the state's farmland is irrigated by the river.

Baehrens says the Department of the Interior and leaders of the seven Western states are meeting to determine the next steps in river conservation.

"While San Diego alone can't have an impact,” she says, “it's the seven different states, the Department of the Interior, all of us working together to improve how we manage that water and do what we can to conserve it.”

A recent study concluded the easiest and most cost effective way to address the imbalance on the Colorado River is to improve urban and agricultural water conservation.


Lori Abbott, Public News Service - CA