Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 17, 2018 


Trump says he is not buying U.S. intelligence as he meets with Putin. Also on the rundown: as harvest nears, farmers speak out on tariffs; immigrant advocates say families should not be kept in cages; and a call for a deeper dive into the Lake Erie algae troubles.

Daily Newscasts

Trying Again in KY for a Dating Violence Law

PHOTO: House Judiciary chairman John Tilley says he will carry the dating violence bill in the 2014 Kentucky legislative session. Photo courtesy LRC Public Information office.
PHOTO: House Judiciary chairman John Tilley says he will carry the dating violence bill in the 2014 Kentucky legislative session. Photo courtesy LRC Public Information office.
October 9, 2013

FRANKFORT, Ky. - Kentucky is behind the times in protecting those who are in a dating relationship from domestic violence, advocates say.

Legislation which would give dating partners the ability to obtain a domestic-violence protection order made it out of the Kentucky House the last three sessions but died in the Senate. House Judiciary chairman John Tilley, D-Hopkinsville, said he will carry the bill again in 2014.

"As a former prosecutor I've witnessed it," Tilley said. "I've seen it first-hand with friends and I've seen how it impacts families."

Tilley said Kentucky is one of "two or three states" that does not extend domestic-violence protections to dating partners. To obtain a protective order, a victim must either be married or have lived with their partner or had a child together.

Darlene Thomas, president of the Kentucky Domestic Violence Association's Board of Directors, said she is confident a dating-violence bill finally will become law in 2014.

"It's been an education process for people to fully understand what kind of impact that means," she said. "How it will benefit a group of individuals who may not be living together, but are very much trapped in dating-violence situations."

Tilley, who has not pre-filed his bill yet, says there are also financial reasons to support the legislation, citing a University of Kentucky study.

"For every $1 invested in the system, $31 is saved when a protective order is issued because there are so many costs down the line that are saved," he said. "It keeps people out of the criminal justice system."

The KDVA also is pushing legislation which would prohibit landlords from penalizing survivors who break leases because of a domestic-violence incident. Thomas said it's a critical piece of legislation for many victims.

"All too often what we see is that people have to flee their place of residence in order to have safety for their themselves and/or children if there are some involved," she said.

Thomas said the lease law also would protect victims from being "stuck with poor rental histories" because they had to leave immediately.

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Greg Stotelmyer , Public News Service - KY