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PNS Daily Newscast - September 26, 2018 


Trump takes the gloves off versus Kavanaugh accusers. Also on the Wednesday rundown: rural areas reap benefits from Medicaid expansion; a two-generation approach to helping young Louisiana parents; and a new documentary on the impact of climate change in North Carolina.

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Privacy Advocates: “Stop Watching Us”

ILLUSTRATION: Saturday is the 12th anniversary of signing the Patriot Act, and some believe the government may have gone too far in its efforts to combat terrorism by conducting surveillance in violation of the Bill of Rights, according to privacy advocates. Courtesy Free Press.
ILLUSTRATION: Saturday is the 12th anniversary of signing the Patriot Act, and some believe the government may have gone too far in its efforts to combat terrorism by conducting surveillance in violation of the Bill of Rights, according to privacy advocates. Courtesy Free Press.
October 25, 2013

WASHINGTON – Revelations by leakers Julian Assange and Edward Snowden have shown U.S. government agencies such as the NSA may have violated Americans' right to privacy, according to advocates who are going to march and rally in Washington this weekend to protest.

Adwoa Masozi, a communications specialist with the Bill of Rights Defense League, points out that as far back as the 1920s, the government was spying on the black nationalist movement of Marcus Garvey.

"This is nothing new,” she says. “This is just something that's affecting everyone, as opposed to certain sects of the political spectrum and different cultural groups, ethnic groups in this country."

The march takes place on the 12th anniversary of the signing the Patriot Act.

Seema Sadanandan, director of the American Civil Liberties Union affiliate in Washington, predicts a large turnout for the march. She says concern over privacy is reaching a turning point.

"What makes Edward Snowden and Julian Assange and their revelations so powerful is that they have propelled our society to engage in a conversation about what privacy means in this context, and in today's age of technology," she explains.

Supporters of the Patriot Act say it has allowed investigators to foil terrorist plots.

Adwoa Masozi isn't buying that.

"There's no evidence to suggest that any of us has been made any safer,” she says, “that it is necessary to sacrifice our liberty for security – none of that."

The march steps off at noon Saturday from Union Station to the Capitol reflecting pool.

It's sponsored by dozens of groups that say they are concerned about civil liberties being pushed aside in the drive to defend the country from domestic and international terrorists.




Mona Shand, Public News Service - MI