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PNS Daily Newscast - November 16, 2018 


Winter Storm Avery takes lives, puts the brakes on commutes across the Northeast. Also on our Friday rundown: A first-of-its-kind report calls for policies to ease transitions of young people living in foster care. And "got gratitude" this holiday season? It could benefit your health.

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Report Connects Climate Change to Disease in MO Deer

PHOTO: A new National Wildlife Federation report outlines how climate change is affecting big game, making a connection between a bleeding disease and deer in Missouri. Photo credit: U.S. Forest Service
PHOTO: A new National Wildlife Federation report outlines how climate change is affecting big game, making a connection between a bleeding disease and deer in Missouri. Photo credit: U.S. Forest Service
November 14, 2013

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - A history lesson and a warning about the changing climate are part of a new report from the National Wildlife Federation that focuses on big game. It notes that huge investments were made in the 20th century, mostly paid by hunters through taxes, to restore domestic big game species. Today, many of those animals are being affected by severe drought, wildfires and changes in timing of the seasons.

Report author Dr. Doug Inkley, a senior scientist at the NWF, explained that in Missouri, a hemorrhagic disease spread by tiny, biting insects likely hit 10,000 deer last year.

"And the reason the proliferation in hot, dry times is because the water sources dry up and so the deer congregate where the no-see-ums are," he said.

The report said that not all big game species are negatively affected by climate change. Bears are resilient and elk may fare better, at least in the short term.

According to Todd Tanner, founder of Conservation Hawks, a hunting and fishing organization, no-can can claim not to see what's happening.

"We have to get our act together. There's literally no time to waste," he warned. "When you're a hunter, when you're someone who spends time on the landscape, this is personal."

The NWF report recommends taking climate change into account for natural resource management, maintaining connections between winter and summer ranges and identifying future habitats for animals as their primary grounds become degraded.

That report, "Nowhere to Run: Big Game Wildlife in a Warming World," is at NWF.org.



Deborah Courson Smith/Deb Courson Smith, Public News Service - MO