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PNS Daily Newscast - November 16, 2018 


Winter Storm Avery takes lives, puts the brakes on commutes across the Northeast. Also on our Friday rundown: A first-of-its-kind report calls for policies to ease transitions of young people living in foster care. And "got gratitude" this holiday season? It could benefit your health.

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One More Holiday Donation? Give Blood

PHOTO: A blood donation can be a lifesaving gift, which is why the American Red Cross hopes people will take time out of their holiday schedules to visit a local blood center or blood drive. Photo courtesy NIH
PHOTO: A blood donation can be a lifesaving gift, which is why the American Red Cross hopes people will take time out of their holiday schedules to visit a local blood center or blood drive. Photo courtesy NIH
December 30, 2013

BILLINGS, Mont. - At hospitals and clinics across Montana, the need for blood 'knows no season,' but donations tend to dry up as the year comes to a close. That's why the call has gone out to Montanans to roll up their sleeves to give a lifesaving gift.

According to Dan Fox, a communications manager for the American Red Cross, what with school vacations, winter weather and busy schedules, the number of donations declines over the holidays, while the need for blood in local hospitals remains constant.

"These could be car accident victims, trauma victims; they could be people undergoing surgery, women going through childbirth, premature babies, cancer patients," he said. "Every two seconds, somebody in this country needs a blood donation."

The American Red Cross estimates that one in ten people admitted to the hospital will require a blood transfusion.

Fox said many people don't think about giving blood until they hear about hospitals facing shortages, or there's been some sort of major tragedy, but he stressed that the blood donations need to be on hospital shelves before emergencies hit.

"It's vitally important to donate blood not just when you hear about a natural disaster or something on the news, because that way we can make sure that blood is available to all patients who need it."

Although nearly 40 percent of people in the U.S. are eligible to give blood, less than ten percent do so each year.

Deborah Courson Smith/Deb Courson Smith, Public News Service - MT