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Trump clashes with Democrats and threatens a government shutdown if he doesn’t get his border wall. Also on the Wednesday rundown: Lawmakers agree on an $867-billion Farm Bill; and a new report finds private community correction centers failing to rehabilitate people who live there.

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Are Older North Carolinians Ready for the Boom of Baby Boomer Retirement?

Photo: AARP North Carolina Executive Council, staff and “Legislators of the Year” honorees (l-r) Henrietta Coursey, Michael Dowling, Dennis Hoadley, James Wall, Robert Palombo, Sen Ellie Kinnaird, Cheryll Schramm, Rep. Nelson Dollar, Doug Dickerson, Mary Bethel. Courtesy: AARP NC
Photo: AARP North Carolina Executive Council, staff and “Legislators of the Year” honorees (l-r) Henrietta Coursey, Michael Dowling, Dennis Hoadley, James Wall, Robert Palombo, Sen Ellie Kinnaird, Cheryll Schramm, Rep. Nelson Dollar, Doug Dickerson, Mary Bethel. Courtesy: AARP NC
January 27, 2014

RALEIGH, N.C. - The U.S. Census estimates that 12,000 people a day are retiring in the United States - up from 10,000 a day just a few years ago - which equates to a few hundred a day in the Tar Heel State. That fact is leading groups such as AARP North Carolina to ask whether baby boomers are adequately prepared.

Doug Dickerson, state director, AARP North Carolina, said older North Carolinians have to do more than just increase their paycheck and curb their spending.

"These last several years, they just haven't been easy. People are cutting back; they're saving more and they're paying down debt and they're postponing retirement, but we know that's not enough," Dickerson said.

Older North Carolinians can do things such as add to their retirement, protect their assets from fraud and evaluate their health coverage, he said. He also pointed out that a majority of employers no longer offer an employer-sponsored retirement plan.

Dickerson said making sure retirees can enjoy their later years should be a team effort by state and federal government and the individuals themselves.

"If you've worked hard your whole life, you've paid into Social Security," he stressed, "and you deserve to have the type of benefits that it provides. At the same time, it's going to take personal work - and that's where AARP is fighting hard."

According to AARP, nearly half of workers age 50 and above have less than $25,000 in savings and investments.



Stephanie Carroll Carson/Diane Ronayne, Public News Service - NC