Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - UPDATE - November 20, 2018 


The death toll rises in a deadly shooting at a Chicago hospital. Also on the Tuesday rundown: community health centers rise to the challenge after wildfires; plus food inspectors can keep your Thanksgiving meal hearty and healthy

Daily Newscasts

NV Psychologist: Little Acts of Kindness Have Big Benefits

PHOTO: A simple smile could mean the world to someone down on their luck during "Random Acts of Kindness Week." Photo courtesy CDC.
PHOTO: A simple smile could mean the world to someone down on their luck during "Random Acts of Kindness Week." Photo courtesy CDC.
February 14, 2014

SPARKS, Nev. – It's Random Acts of Kindness Week, and something as simple as smiling at another person could even prevent a suicide.

Michelle Burke, a clinical psychologist with Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services, says people battling mental illness are often isolated and feel alone or misunderstood.

She says kindness shown by another person can be very powerful.

"When somebody just makes eye contact and smiles, it can be the first person who's looked at them or acknowledged them in a day or a week, or a month," she says.

Random Acts of Kindness Week asks that everyone try to step out of his or her normal routine or comfort zone and do something nice for someone else, each day this week.

Suggestions include buying a stranger coffee, volunteering, paying someone a compliment – and of course, smiling.

Burke says being kind is good not only for the recipient of that kindness, but also for the person who has taken the time to be kind.

She says research shows that doing nice things for others has a positive effect by touching the pleasure centers of the brain.

"Almost immediately when we do a random act of kindness, our brain senses it and we get more energy, we feel better about ourselves, our self-esteem gets higher," she explains.

Burke cites a Harvard University study, which shows that the human immune system also benefits from performing random acts of kindness.


Troy Wilde, Public News Service - NV