Newscasts

PNS Daily News - December 9, 2019 


The Pensacola shooting investigated as an act of terror; Trump faces criticism over so-called anti-Semitic comments; and some local governments adapt to meet the needs of immigrants.

2020Talks - December 9, 2019 


Candidates have a busy week in Iowa, despite a weekend shooting on Pensacola Navy Air Base. Also, candidates start butting heads, notably South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg and MA Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

Minnesota Lawmakers Again Pushed to Work on Gun Violence Prevention

PHOTO: It was on this day in 1994 that the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act took effect. Photo credit: Josh Berglund
PHOTO: It was on this day in 1994 that the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act took effect. Photo credit: Josh Berglund
February 28, 2014

ST. PAUL, Minn. - It's a landmark 20th anniversary today for those across the state and nation who are working to prevent gun violence.

The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act took effect on this day in 1994, requiring background checks on firearms purchased from a federally licensed dealer.

Heather Martens, executive director of Protect Minnesota, said it's been an effective tool in keeping guns out of the hands of felons and people with mental illnesses.

"Two-point-one million purchases were stopped by the Brady background check law since 1994," she said. "And we know in Minnesota that the local background check laws that govern some of our gun purchases have been really critically important in keeping guns away from people who shouldn't have them."

The Brady Act is named after James Brady, who was shot during the attempted assassination of President Ronald Reagan in 1981.

In Minnesota, the issue of how to reduce gun violence has been debated regularly at the Legislature, and Martens said that will be maintained this session.

"We're continuing to educate our legislators about the importance of background checks in keeping down gun deaths and gun homicides," she said. "We're over at the Legislature pushing for reforms in gun laws this year, as we always are, and we'll see what happens."

On average, every day in Minnesota one person is injured and another killed by a firearm, according to the Minnesota Department of Health.

More information on the Brady act is online at usgovinfo.about.com, and Minnesota firearms statistics are at health.state.mn.us.

John Michaelson, Public News Service - MN