Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - December 10, 2018 


Nick Ayers is said to reject Trump’s offer to be White House chief of staff. Also on the Monday rundown: Help still needed in areas hit hard by Hurricane Michael; and look for a domestic workers' bill of rights to be introduced in Congress next year.

Daily Newscasts

Serving Kids in Poverty is Focus of OEA Symposium

PHOTO: ODE estimates 3.65 percent of Oregon public school students are homeless. How schools can help them, and others in poverty, more effectively is the focus of an OEA Education Symposium in Salem. Photo credit: iStockphoto.com.
PHOTO: ODE estimates 3.65 percent of Oregon public school students are homeless. How schools can help them, and others in poverty, more effectively is the focus of an OEA Education Symposium in Salem. Photo credit: iStockphoto.com.
March 24, 2014

SALEM, Ore. - When one in four children in Oregon lives in poverty, the effects cannot help but ripple through schools across the state. At the Oregon Education Association (OEA) annual symposium today, the topic is how to cope with those effects. More than 100 educators and community leaders will hear from Dr. Pedro Noguera, a sociologist and education professor at New York University, whose research focuses on how to help students succeed under tough social and economic conditions.

Coming to school hungry and stressed out by an unstable living situation compromises more than a child's ability to learn, Noguera says.

"The high stress levels in the body affect everything from digestion to brain development, to the ability to concentrate and function. And it undermines performance," Noguera explains.

Noguera, a former classroom teacher, says schools in areas with high concentrations of poverty are often overwhelmed by all the needs to be filled and could use more support from policymakers. The Oregon Department of Education reports that more than 21,000 public school students in the state are homeless, topping 3.5 percent of total enrollment.

Even when budgets are tight, Noguera says schools can be creative and reach out to form partnerships with community groups and volunteers. And while they cannot take the place of loving parents or a stable home life, he says teachers, tutors, social workers and counselors can be part of the solution by recognizing problems and knowing how to react.

"Many children have trouble talking about stress and articulating what's going on with them. So, we may not realize that a child who's disruptive or behaving aggressively might actually be experiencing a lot of stress. Too often, we respond to the behavior rather than the issues triggering that behavior."

Attendees at the OEA Education Symposium also will hear from Dr. Nancy Golden, Oregon's Chief Education Officer.

The symposium will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Salem Convention Center, 200 Commercial St. SE, Salem.

ODE data on homeless students (2011-12) is available at www.ode.state.or.us.

Chris Thomas, Public News Service - OR