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PNS Daily Newscast - July 18, 2018 


Trump now says he misspoke as he stood side-by-side with Putin. Also on the Wednesday rundown: A Senate committee looks at the latest attempt to weaken the Endangered Species Act; and public input is being sought on Great Lakes restoration.

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Parents: Stick With Stuffed or Candy Bunnies and Chicks for Easter

PHOTO: Bunnies are a symbol of the season, but animal welfare advocates caution parents considering bringing one home for Easter to make a thoughtful decision that is best for the animal and the family. Photo credit: morguefile.com user bobby.
PHOTO: Bunnies are a symbol of the season, but animal welfare advocates caution parents considering bringing one home for Easter to make a thoughtful decision that is best for the animal and the family. Photo credit: morguefile.com user bobby.
April 18, 2014

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Easter is almost upon us, and while some parents might be tempted to give their children live bunnies or baby chicks, animal welfare advocates stress that bringing any animal into the home should be a well thought-out decision and not just a holiday whim.

Kristin Branagan, director of behavior and adoptions at the Humane Society of Greater Akron, says
with the right nutrition, housing and exercise, rabbits can make great pets, but they are a long-term family commitment.

"They're not just giving a gift, they're giving a life,” she points out. “They aren't just cute and cuddly at all times. They do need a little bit extra TLC and attention and expenses."

Branagan says many people overlook the fact that fuzzy little chicks will eventually grow into hens or roosters and rabbits can live upwards of 10 years.

She recommends families do their research and know the facts before they bring a furry or feathered friend home.

Branagan suggests parents considering a rabbit give their children a stuffed one for Easter, and then make an appointment with a local shelter to discuss the options after the holiday.

"We always have rabbits up for adoption and you can look into fostering maybe before purchasing,” she says. “So if you're thinking of making a long-term commitment with a rabbit, maybe look into fostering a rabbit in your home first and see if that's the right type of animal."

Also, she says it is not realistic to expect a child younger than 12 to be the primary caretaker of any animal, so parents need to accept that the responsibility may fall on them for many y

Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - OH