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Internet Equality Day of Action Today

GRAPHIC: A poster calls for opponents of the FCC's proposed rule change on net neutrality to rally at the agency today. Credit: Free Press.
GRAPHIC: A poster calls for opponents of the FCC's proposed rule change on net neutrality to rally at the agency today. Credit: Free Press.
May 15, 2014

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – Internet freedom advocates are calling for a day of action today at the Federal Communications Commission as the FCC prepares to vote on policy changes that would allow Comcast, Verizon and other service providers to charge more for outfits such as Netflix or Hulu to use higher download speeds, while others are stuck in slower lanes.

This, critics say, would violate the principle of net neutrality.

Sarah Arnold, activism campaign manager for The Nation says media outlets such as her publication would face discrimination.

"Alternative media outlets, which couldn't pay for the faster service, their content would download slower so readers could get frustrated, could give up on accessing the content,” she stresses. “So we would have less access to hearing from marginal voices."

A rally is set for this morning outside the FCC headquarters in Washington, and events have been organized at 20 of the 24 FCC field offices around the country.

A broader issue is whether the Internet is a public utility or common carrier and should be regulated like phone service is, or whether it's an information service.

Arnold says The Nation has a position on that.

"Calling on the FCC to reclassify broadband as a public utility so they would be able to regulate it more strictly in the public interest and ensure real net neutrality," she explains.

The big cable and phone companies in the Internet business want the Internet to remain an information service, with minimal government oversight.


Deborah Courson Smith/Deb Courson Smith, Public News Service - MD