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Efforts continue to quell the backlash over President Donald Trump’s changing statements on the Russia summit. Also on the Thursday rundown: protestors are out for Mike Pence’s visit to Missouri; and nobody wants to go, but one option is green burials.

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Report: Climate Change Hurting Current and Future Wildlife Generations

PHOTO: Smallmouth bass are among the Michigan wildlife species at risk because of climate change, because fertilized eggs may not get enough dissolved oxygen in warmer waters, according to a new report from the National Wildlife Federation. Photo credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
PHOTO: Smallmouth bass are among the Michigan wildlife species at risk because of climate change, because fertilized eggs may not get enough dissolved oxygen in warmer waters, according to a new report from the National Wildlife Federation. Photo credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
May 16, 2014

LANSING, Mich. – With Mother's Day behind us and Father's Day right around the corner, a new report finds it's a tough time to be a wildlife parent because of the impact of climate change on natural habitats and species.

Felice Stadler, senior director for climate and energy with the National Wildlife Federation, is the lead author of the report, which highlights the impact of warmer temperatures, changes in precipitation and more intense wildfires on the state's animals, birds, plants and fish.

"Food and shelter are increasingly vulnerable, as droughts, warmer waters and pests present seasonal hardships for wildlife," she explains.

Stadler adds warmer temperatures are robbing some Michigan streams of oxygen, putting the survival of brook trout and smallmouth bass eggs at risk, and causing heat stress for animals such as moose.

The report recommends immediate action to reduce carbon pollution, especially from coal-fired power plants as the best way to lessen the impact of climate change.

Brenda Archambo, Michigan outreach consultant for the National Wildlife Federation, says Michigan's unique wildlife has played a major role in helping to shape its history, which is why she says it's so urgent to safeguard current and future generations.

"Climate change is making it harder and harder for many animals to raise their young and keep them well fed and healthy, making parenting increasingly stressful for wildlife," she stresses.

Archambo points to new carbon-pollution standards expected to be announced by the Obama administration next month as a good first step toward protecting Michigan and the nation's wildlife legacy.



Mona Shand, Public News Service - MI