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PNS Daily Newscast - September 26, 2018 


Trump takes the gloves off versus Kavanaugh accusers. Also on the Wednesday rundown: rural areas reap benefits from Medicaid expansion; a two-generation approach to helping young Louisiana parents; and a new documentary on the impact of climate change in North Carolina.

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Oil Spill Cleanup Continues at Green River, Utah

PHOTO: The cleanup continues, but the amount of oil that spilled into the Green River from a leaking oil well last week near Green River, Utah, has not yet been determined. Photo credit: Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.
PHOTO: The cleanup continues, but the amount of oil that spilled into the Green River from a leaking oil well last week near Green River, Utah, has not yet been determined. Photo credit: Utah Division of Wildlife Resources.
May 29, 2014

GREEN RIVER, Utah – As cleanup efforts continue, the amount of oil that entered the Green River is not yet known following last week's oil spill on public land near the city of Green River, Utah.

According to Beth Ransel, field manager for the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) Moab Field Office, a thunderstorm caused oil and other contaminants from the leaking oil well to enter the river.

"On Saturday, it was discovered that the storm event overcame those preventive measures," says Ransel, "and oil residues that were present in the wash did make their way into the Green River."

Ransel says the oil spill happened last Wednesday (May 21) at a well owned by SW Energy, approximately 12 miles southeast of the town. She adds the cause of the leak appears to be mechanical failure on the 45-year-old well.

Both the Utah Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have personnel monitoring the cleanup efforts.

Tim Wagner with the Sierra Club of Utah points out that any amount of oil is particularly dangerous because the Green River is part of the Colorado River System, a key part of the water supply to several Western states.

"Particularly this spill, that's directly in the water supply for 35 million people in the American Southwest," says Wagner. "I'd be greatly concerned if I was the mother of four kids in Tucson, Arizona, who gets their water from the Colorado River."

To help prevent future oil spills, Wagner believes there should be much tighter government regulation on energy companies.

Troy Wilde, Public News Service - UT