Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - UPDATE - November 20, 2018 


The death toll rises in a deadly shooting at a Chicago hospital. Also on the Tuesday rundown: community health centers rise to the challenge after wildfires; plus food inspectors can keep your Thanksgiving meal hearty and healthy

Daily Newscasts

New Carbon Rules Could Put Missouri on New Track

PHOTO: Missouri currently relies on coal-fired power plants for 80 percent of the state's electricity, one of the highest in the nation, but environmental leaders feel confident the state can meet new goals set by the EPA to reduce carbon pollution. Photo credit: click/morguefile.com
PHOTO: Missouri currently relies on coal-fired power plants for 80 percent of the state's electricity, one of the highest in the nation, but environmental leaders feel confident the state can meet new goals set by the EPA to reduce carbon pollution. Photo credit: click/morguefile.com
June 3, 2014

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Energy and coal have been tightly linked throughout Missouri's history, but environmental advocates say the new standards proposed by the Obama administration to reduce carbon emissions from coal power plants offer the opportunity to begin a new chapter.

John Hickey, chapter director of the Sierra Club in Missouri, calls climate change from carbon pollution the biggest challenge facing this generation, and says he believes the new rules could be a turning point.

"Now is the time to take action when we can transition to a more efficient and cleaner economy in a way that is less disruptive and that gets us the benefits of the local jobs, the cleaner air, the lower utility bills," he says.

Under the proposal, Missouri would need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from coal power plants by 21 percent by 2030, a less aggressive target than many other states.

Hickey says he feels the goal is realistic because it can include boosting the use of renewable-energy sources such as wind and solar power.

While some Republican legislators in Missouri have criticized the plan, suggesting it could drive up the price of electricity, Hickey says Missourians already are paying a steep price when it comes to the state's environmental legacy.

"I want to see a Missouri that is livable and has got the same benefits that I enjoyed growing up,” he says. “I think it's only fair that our children inherit that and that we don't give them a world that's been trashed."

Right now, roughly 80 percent of the energy generated in Missouri comes from coal, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.


Mona Shand, Public News Service - MO