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Better Business Bureau Warns New Mexicans of Bank Card Scam

PHOTO: The Better Business Bureau is urging New Mexicans to be aware of a scam targeting their ATM and credit card information with calls to their smartphone or cell phone. Photo courtesy U.S. Dept. of Energy.
PHOTO: The Better Business Bureau is urging New Mexicans to be aware of a scam targeting their ATM and credit card information with calls to their smartphone or cell phone. Photo courtesy U.S. Dept. of Energy.
June 5, 2014

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – The Better Business Bureau of New Mexico is cautioning the public about a scam that targets a person's financial information.

Connie Quillen, executive assistant at the Better Business Bureau of New Mexico and Southwest Colorado, says the scam usually involves a victim receiving a text message or phone call saying that his or her debit, credit or ATM card has been cancelled or deactivated.

She says the message includes a telephone number to a customer service department, which the victim is urged to call to reactivate the card.

"A lot of times, people will immediately go ahead and make that call,” she relates. “They'll call the number back that's been given to them.

“And without even thinking sometimes, when the caller asks for the 16-digit account number, someone will just plug in their 16-digit debit or credit card number without even thinking about it."

Quillen says this particular scam has been around for quite a while and continues to resurface because people continue to fall for it.

The New Mexico Attorney General's office has received complaints about the latest robo-calls since March.

Quillen advises verifying any phone call, text message, or email from someone claiming to be, or represent, your financial institution.

"Call your bank or credit union at the phone number that you recognize as their phone number,” Quillen urges. “Give them a call and verify – did they send that text message or make that phone call to you?"


Troy Wilde, Public News Service - NM