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Some Tips to Save On Energy Costs During Arizona Summer

PHOTO: Arizonans can spend a small fortune on energy costs while trying to keep cool during the summer, but little things can be done to save some big money on utility bills. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
PHOTO: Arizonans can spend a small fortune on energy costs while trying to keep cool during the summer, but little things can be done to save some big money on utility bills. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
June 24, 2014

PHOENIX - Keeping cool during Arizona's extreme summer heat can be costly, but a few things can be done to save some money this summer.

According to Kathleen Mascarenas with the Salt River Project, energy bills for bigger homes during the hottest months of the year can easily reach several hundred dollars. She says the best way to begin saving money is by keeping a close eye on the thermostat.

"A pretty simple solution is to bump up the thermostat," says Mascarenas. "For every degree the thermostat is above 80 degrees, a customer can save up to three percent on cooling costs."

Mascarenas says air conditioning is easily the single biggest energy cost for consumers in the summer, accounting for at least half of a summertime utility bill. She adds cooling costs can be further cut by closing the curtains and keeping the sun's heat out of the home.

Using as little energy as possible during peak consumption hours of 3 to 6 p.m. also goes a long way.

"You're paying more when energy is most in demand," says Mascarenas. "When you're using a high amount of energy during peak time, it's going to cost you more. In the middle of the day, electricity use is just like a traffic jam when everyone else is using it."

Mascarenas says even something as benign as turning off ceiling fans when you're not in the room will also save energy.

Troy Wilde/Chris Thomas, Public News Service - AZ