PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 24, 2020 


President Trump refuses to commit to a peaceful transfer of power post election; and COVID vaccine #4 needs volunteers.


2020Talks - September 24, 2020 


A new report highlights importance of keeping guns away from the polls; and Florida wants an investigation of a fund to help pay returning citizens' court fees and fines so they can vote.

State Fire Marshal: Fireworks are Legal, but Still Dangerous

PHOTO: Indiana's State Fire Marshal is reminding residents to follow the law and use common sense to prevent fireworks-related injuries and fires during the Fourth of July holiday. Photo credit: Alvimann / Morguefile.
PHOTO: Indiana's State Fire Marshal is reminding residents to follow the law and use common sense to prevent fireworks-related injuries and fires during the Fourth of July holiday. Photo credit: Alvimann / Morguefile.
July 1, 2014

INDIANAPOLIS - Fireworks and the Fourth of July may go hand-in-hand, but Hoosiers are being reminded to use common sense when celebrating this week. Consumer fireworks such as firecrackers, bottle rockets, and roman candles are legal in Indiana, but State Fire Marshal James Greeson says they are still dangerous.

"There's many more fires usually reported on Fourth of July weekends, or those days right around Fourth of July," says Greeson. "It's that time of year when more injuries occur, and over a third of those injuries are people under 18 years of age - primarily children."

Greeson says the safest option is to leave fireworks to the professionals and attend local, licensed and approved fireworks displays where proper safety precautions are in place.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in the weeks surrounding the July 4th holiday about 200 people per day visit emergency rooms with fireworks-related injuries.

State law says fireworks can be set off between 9 a.m. and 11 p.m. any day of the week. On holidays, that time period is extended to midnight. Fireworks can be set off on your own property, the property of someone else who gives permission, or at a designated local jurisdiction. Greeson says fireworks should only be handled by adults, even the novelty types.

"Sparklers are a big thing with kids," says Greeson, "and we understand that, especially with little bitty kids. It's all about the excitement. We recommend in place of sparklers, maybe a parent buys glow sticks. They're always safe and they last for quite a while longer."

Setting off fireworks in an unauthorized location is a violation of state law, along with damaging property or injuring someone while using fireworks. Penalties range from fines of $500 to $1,000, or possible jail time, depending on the offense.

Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - IN