Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - August 26, 2019 


in Colorado 0fficials to consider overtime, and other worker protections. Plus; tobacco-free signs svailable to all KY schools .

2020Talks – August 26, 2019. (3 min.) 


Introducing a Mon.-Fri. newscast tracking the 2020 Elections, starting with Iowa, First in the Nation. Tea Party Republican Joe Walsh enters GOP race; Sen. Bernie Sanders explains what he means by "Democratic Socialism;" and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee drops his bid for the Democratic nomination.

Daily Newscasts

Citizen Hearing on Federal Clean Power Plan

PHOto: Todd Tanner, president of Conservation Hawks, testified at a citizens' hearing in Missoula last night that climate change is a threat to the state's hunting and fishing heritage. He supports the proposed federal Clean Power Plan to reduce carbon emissions. Photo courtesy of Tanner.
PHOto: Todd Tanner, president of Conservation Hawks, testified at a citizens' hearing in Missoula last night that climate change is a threat to the state's hunting and fishing heritage. He supports the proposed federal Clean Power Plan to reduce carbon emissions. Photo courtesy of Tanner.
July 24, 2014

MISSOULA, Mont. – "We all see it happening" was the sentiment about climate change at a citizens' hearing Wednesday night in Missoula about the proposed federal Clean Power Plan that sets goals for reducing pollution associated with climate change.

Representatives from health, environmental and agricultural industries shared their concerns related to the rule. In his time at the podium, Todd Tanner, president of Conservation Hawks, a hunting and angling rights group, said sportsmen are firsthand witnesses.

"We're seeing all sorts of impacts, including higher temperatures, earlier snowmelt and runoff, more severe droughts, dying forests and more extreme wildfires," said Tanner.

The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) plan is to reduce overall carbon pollution from coal-fired power plants by 30 percent by 2030. Economic concerns are strong in Montana because coal has long been an economic force.

Hearings on the rule are being held next week, but not in Montana - which is why a local hearing was held.

Steph Larsen, senior policy organizer at the Center for Rural Affairs, testified that the rule offers Montana new incentives to diversify energy production - and sell those products to other states.

"Limiting carbon through power plants will help dramatically shift Americans' energy sources toward wind energy and other renewable sources," she said. "And these clean-energy technologies will produce less carbon, and create lots of economic opportunities and jobs."

Larsen added that even though the EPA is not coming to Montana to gather input, it's important for people to speak up - and comments can be made online, by email, snail-mail or fax.

"We understand that this rule isn't perfect," Larsen said. "There's lots of things we think we need to change, but that's why we need to speak up now, in order to make sure that it gets better."

The hearing was sponsored by several organizations, including Conservation Hawks, Montana Audubon, Montana Elders for a Livable Tomorrow and the National Wildlife Federation.

Deborah Courson Smith/Deb Courson Smith, Public News Service - MT