Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 25, 2018 


The list of accusers against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh continues to swell. Also on the Tuesday rundown: Hurricane Florence SNAPs North Carolina to attention on the importance of food benefits; plus a new report says young parents need better supports.

Daily Newscasts

Albuquerque Hosts Human Rights Hearings Today

PHOTO: Native Americans, immigrants and others are expected to testify at a human rights hearing today (Wed.) in Albuquerque. Their views will be part of a United Nations review of U.S. compliance with an international human rights treaty. Image courtesy U.S. State Department
PHOTO: Native Americans, immigrants and others are expected to testify at a human rights hearing today (Wed.) in Albuquerque. Their views will be part of a United Nations review of U.S. compliance with an international human rights treaty. Image courtesy U.S. State Department
July 30, 2014

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - Testimony gathered at a human-rights hearing in Albuquerque today will be included as part of an overall review of U.S. compliance with an international human rights treaty.

Ejim Dike, executive director of the U.S. Human Rights Network, the group organizing the hearing, said she expects testimony from Native Americans who have suffered long-term health problems from mining on their land, and also from immigrants sharing their experience of entering the United States.

"So, it's experiences that they've had, and that their family members have had - in particular, crossing the border," she said, "and also, experiences family members have had with being in detention."

Dike said testimony from human-rights hearings in New Mexico, Arizona and several other states will be included in a United Nations review of U.S. compliance with what is known as "CERD," the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, next month in Geneva, Switzerland.

Dike said America's treatment of the nearly 60,000 undocumented children who have entered the United States in the past year will likely be under international scrutiny next month. For a nation with a rich history of promoting and protecting human rights, she said she thinks the United States isn't showing leadership in its treatment of children fleeing some of the deadliest places on Earth.

"Not in this case, they have not been doing that," she said. "Starting to deport children back into dangerous situations is not an example of a human rights champion."

Dike said the undocumented children provide an opportunity for the United States to show the rest of the world how it treats innocent victims fleeing street gangs, sexual slavery and other deadly factors in Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala.

The hearing is to begin at 6 p.m. today at the Albuquerque Center for Peace and Justice, 202 Harvard Drive S.E., Albuquerque. Information on the hearing is online at salsa3.salsalabs.com.

Troy Wilde, Public News Service - NM