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Older Iowans Want Candidates to Focus on Economy

PHOTO: A new poll shows economic security and support for caregivers are key issues for older Iowans as they decide which candidates to support in the November general election. Photo credit: Tax Credit/Flickr.
PHOTO: A new poll shows economic security and support for caregivers are key issues for older Iowans as they decide which candidates to support in the November general election. Photo credit: Tax Credit/Flickr.
August 12, 2014

DES MOINES, Iowa - The November general election is less than three months away, and a new poll shows older Iowans are seeking candidates who will focus on improving their economic security.

Nancy LeaMond, executive vice president with AARP, says their survey questioned likely Iowa voters age 50 and up, and found that due to the high cost of living, especially with health care and taxes, many older Iowans have made the decision to postpone retirement.

"For too many older Americans, including older workers and retirees, their income isn't keeping up with their daily cost of living," says LeaMond. "Across party lines, workers 50 and older are worried that a secure retirement could be out of reach."

LeaMond says care-giving is also a vital issue in this election for older Iowans, who want to stay in and receive care in their homes, allowing them to live independently as they age.

Another key finding from the poll, explains LeaMond, is older Iowans have had enough of political jargon and spin, and want to hear common sense solutions.

"They say they haven't heard enough about candidates' plans for key issues like Medicare, Social Security, independent living and financial security," says LeaMond. ""The message from 50-plus voters is clear: in a razor-tight election, candidates have an opportunity to reach these key voters by speaking about their plans on the issues. We think they're making a huge gamble if they ignore them."

Razor-tight is how the race for U.S. Senate in Iowa could be described, as older voters are evenly divided among the two major candidates, with about one-in-six still undecided.

John Michaelson, Public News Service - IA