Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 20, 2018.  


Trump now wants Putin to visit the White House this fall; Also on the Friday rundown: health insurance rates to rise by almost 9 percent in California; and as the climate crises reaches “Zero Hour” young people take a stand.

Daily Newscasts

Older Michiganders Want Candidates to Address Financial Worries

PHOTO: Michigan voters aged 50 and older have a lot on their minds when it comes to their future financial security, and a new poll of likely senior voters reveals they're not getting the answers they need from political candidates. Photo credit: Menstatic/Morguefile.
PHOTO: Michigan voters aged 50 and older have a lot on their minds when it comes to their future financial security, and a new poll of likely senior voters reveals they're not getting the answers they need from political candidates. Photo credit: Menstatic/Morguefile.
August 18, 2014

DETROIT - With the August primary over and candidates making the final push toward the November election, AARP Michigan is cautioning candidates to consider listening to voters 50 and older, who will likely take their fears about finances into the voting booth.

A new poll commissioned by AARP Michigan finds older Michiganders have significant questions about health care expenses, financial security in retirement, and the ability to live independently. AARP Michigan state director Jacqueline Morrison says, at the moment, seniors aren't getting answers.

"For care giving, 73 percent of those seniors who responded to our poll said they wanted to hear more on these issues," says Morrison. "For Medicare, 77 percent said they wanted to hear more. For Social Security, 77 percent said they wanted to hear more."

Morrison adds that with U.S. Senate candidates Gary Peters and Terri Lynn Land in a virtual dead heat, these issues could be determining factors for the nearly 30 percent of Michiganders who are still undecided in the race.

In the 2012 general election, voters aged 50 and older accounted for 55 percent of the electorate in Michigan, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Morrison says candidates simply can't ignore the concerns of such a large group of voters.

"It's an important component of the electorate, and they study the issues," she says. "They vote based on issues and what they're hearing from the candidates."

With 60 percent of those surveyed saying they have had difficulty finding objective and reliable information about candidates running for office this November, Morrison feels the results should send a clear signal to candidates it's time to drop campaign rhetoric and speak directly to the people of Michigan.

The full results of the survey are available on AARP Michigan's website.

Mona Shand, Public News Service - MI