Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 23, 2018 


A GOP Congressman and former FBI agent tells NPR he believes Trump was compromised by Putin. Also on the Monday rundown: a report on how trade wars could be risky business for the whiskey business: and the wealthiest Americans get richer as the wage gap widens.

Daily Newscasts

New Study Tackles Issue of High School Football Concussions

PHOTO: An independent study by the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health says there's no difference in concussion risk among high school football players using different brands of helmets. Photo credit: University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh.
PHOTO: An independent study by the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health says there's no difference in concussion risk among high school football players using different brands of helmets. Photo credit: University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh.
August 19, 2014

MADISON, Wis. - A just-released study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin (UW)-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health concludes there's no difference in concussion rates among Wisconsin high school football players using different brands and ages of football helmets.

Tim McGuine, senior scientist with the Department of Orthopedics at the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, co-authored the study of more than 2,000 players during a two-year period. He says there were some surprises in the study, including one about youth football.

"There's experts that say the more these kids play youth tackle football, the greater risk they are to have serious concussions in high school," says McGuine. "We found that not to be the case at all. A kid playing freshman football for the first time, tackle football, had no greater risk of having a concussion than a kid who played tackle, hard-tackle football."

The study says while parents often want to buy the newest, most expensive football helmet to protect their child, there was nothing in the study to show that any specific brand of helmet performed better than another. The study was paid for by the University of Wisconsin and did not involve any outside money.

McGuine also says the study challenges the idea coaches don't care about concussions and just want kids to play football.

"We're getting contacted by coaches asking 'I want to be part of the solution; can we do that study here?' and they're not worried about finding a high risk of concussion in their players," says McGuine. "They want to do what's right for their kids, more so than any other coaching group in the state of Wisconsin. I will put them up against anybody, and the myth that these coaches are just putting those kids out there and playing and they don't care - that's so far from the truth."

As a father, McGuine also recommends good dental protection.

"When my son played high school sports and wrestled, and my daughters played basketball, they always wore a custom-fitted mouthguard," he says. "They went to their dentist and they had the dentist make a mold of their teeth to have them use a mouthguard, and I think parents should get the best mouthguard they can for dental protection - but don't buy that thinking they're going to get concussion protection."

Tim Morrissey, Public News Service - WI