Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 23, 2018 


A GOP Congressman and former FBI agent tells NPR he believes Trump was compromised by Putin. Also on the Monday rundown: a report on how trade wars could be risky business for the whiskey business: and the wealthiest Americans get richer as the wage gap widens.

Daily Newscasts

Showing Off Appalachia's Bright Future

PHOTO: What's happening on Main Street in Whitesburg is one example of economic diversification being highlighted at the Appalachia's Bright Future event this weekend. Photo courtesy of Art of the Rural.
PHOTO: What's happening on Main Street in Whitesburg is one example of economic diversification being highlighted at the Appalachia's Bright Future event this weekend. Photo courtesy of Art of the Rural.
September 10, 2014

HARLAN, Ky. - When Whitesburg business owner Josh May sees eastern Kentucky's future, he sees a "blank canvas" for diversifying the region's economy. The Letcher County resident says the state's mountain communities are making the transition from what some call a "mono-economy," which has been dependent on coal for generations.

"We're really moving from the theoretical of what people would like to see or think is possible in eastern Kentucky, to the tangible and the practical," May says.

Real-life examples of that transition will be on display during the "Appalachia's Bright Future" event this weekend in Harlan and Letcher Counties. The event, which begins Friday night, will give people a chance to meet and learn from those diversifying through arts, culture, food and energy.

The event is described as "a transition adventure, a multi-day tour and celebration that will give participants the opportunity to meet and learn directly from people and communities on both sides of Pine Mountain who are working to build a healthy and diverse local economy."

Whitesburg native Ada Smith says her town's Main Street is coming to life.

"For the first time in my lifetime there's actual nightlife after 5 p.m.," says the 27-year-old Smith. "There's not only a couple of bars, but there's a new bakery and a couple of places to eat."

Several other new stores, according to Smith, are also contributing to the economic transition.

For example, May is part of a workers' co-op that opened Roundabout Music Company this summer; a business he says is aimed at helping musicians across eastern Kentucky.

"Not only are they consumers and buy our products, we also work with them to provide services, like workshops and music lessons," he says.

Smith says "Appalachia's Bright Future" highlights the beginnings of what she believes can be a "vibrant, diverse economy."

"My hope is people see what there is to invest in and what eastern Kentucky has to offer for the entire state, because there's a lot of lessons that can be learned throughout Kentucky."

More information on the event can be found at kftc.org/abf.

Greg Stotelmyer , Public News Service - KY