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PNS Daily Newscast - November 11, 2018. 


More than 12-hundred missing in the California wildfires. Also on the Monday rundown: a pair of reports on gun violence in the nation; plus concerns that proposed Green-Card rules favor the wealthy.

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Ohio Hospice Helping Veterans with PTSD Find Peace

PHOTO:A hospice in Sandusky is helping U.S. military veterans suffering with Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome find peace in their final days. Photo credit: Karen van Vuuren.
PHOTO:A hospice in Sandusky is helping U.S. military veterans suffering with Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome find peace in their final days. Photo credit: Karen van Vuuren.
September 30, 2014

SANDUSKY, Ohio - Stein Hospice in Sandusky is helping U.S. military veterans who served in World War II, and every military conflict since, deal with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, the effects of which some have held inside for more than half a century. The Department of Veterans Affairs estimates up to 30 percent of vets suffer with PTSD. Scott Boros is a bereavement and grief counselor at Stein Hospice.

"There's a lot of the World War II guys now, finally 60 or 70 years later, and the Korean guys, talking about stuff they would never talk about," says Boros. "The other thing that occurred, which is very heartfelt, is a lot of these guys said they wouldn't talk about stuff because they didn't want to hurt their mothers."

For many vets, the process of sharing the horrors of war helps them let go of the past and find peace in the present. Boros adds, Stein Hospice works with veterans of all ages suffering with PTSD. The Veterans Administration estimates 22 veterans commit suicide each day, and 69 percent of them are age 50 and older.

Jacye Elliston is a veteran who served during the Persian Gulf War and is living with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. He says just talking about his war experiences through a VA-provided service is helping him cope. Elliston adds, more organizations such as Stein Hospice could make a huge impact on reaching out to the often-isolated veterans with PTSD.

"There are a ton of services out there for veterans that they don't know about," says Elliston. "There needs to be a more coordinated effort in reaching out to veterans that don't reach out themselves."

Stein Hospice is featured in a forthcoming documentary titled "Go in Peace." Director Karen van Vuuren says her father's sharing of his World War II experiences inspired the documentary.

"He was actually a Dutchman. His village was occupied in World War II. When he was dying he told me the story of strangling a German soldier from his village when he was 14 years old," she says. "He never told me anything about the war and it just woke me up to what these people carry inside them."

Van Vuuren hopes "Go in Peace" will become a free resource for anyone to use and help us better understand what military veterans can experience long after war ends. She says the documentary is nearly complete, but requires more work before it can be released. Van Vuuren is hoping to raise $20,000 through a crowdfunding campaign. More information is at goinpeace.myinstapage.com.

Troy Wilde, Public News Service - OH