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PNS Daily Newscast - September 18, 2018 


Kavanaugh now expected to meet his accuser at an open hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday. Also on the Tuesday rundown: An Albany rally calls for a million solar households; and #GetCaughtReading – a weeklong campaign for readers of all ages.

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Despite Halloween Fame, Bats Help AZ Farmers and Others

PHOTO: Bats are helpful to Arizona farmers and people in general, despite being a mainstay among the Halloween creatures that may cause fear in some people. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
PHOTO: Bats are helpful to Arizona farmers and people in general, despite being a mainstay among the Halloween creatures that may cause fear in some people. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
October 29, 2014

PHOENIX - Halloween is just a couple of days away, and bats may be among the creepy creatures meant to cause fright - but the little animals actually help Arizona farmers and people.

Lynda Lambert, public information officer for the Arizona Game and Fish Department, said bats feast on insects.

"They eat tons of insects at night - insects that destroy crops and have an economic effect, but also insects that can carry disease," she said. "So, they really do provide a benefit."

According to the Game and Fish Department, Arizona was the first state to have a full-time position within its wildlife agency specifically to work with bats. The department also has had its conservation-minded Bat Management Program in place since 1990.

The 28 species of bats that call the Grand Canyon State home can be found in deserts and forests, Lambert said, adding that they seem to be thriving.

"There certainly are some species that are more prevalent than others throughout the area," she said, "but yes, we have a very healthy bat population throughout the state."

The biggest challenge to bat conservation, according to the Game and Fish Department, is the lack of knowledge about most species. Other challenges include roost disturbance from recreational caving and mine exploration, renewed mining interest and vandalism.

Troy Wilde, Public News Service - AZ