Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 15, 2019 


President Trump asks SCOTUS to block release of his tax returns; use of the death penalty is on the decline across the country; and a push to make nutrition part of the health-care debate.

2020Talks - November 14, 2019 


It's World Diabetes Day, and health care, including the high cost of insulin and other drugs, is a top issue for many voters. Plus, do early states like Iowa and New Hampshire have an outsized role in the nomination process?

Daily Newscasts

Michiganders Needed To Report Ash Borer Survivors

PHOTO: Scientists once feared Michigan had no remaining healthy ash trees like this one. However since spotting and analyzing a few, the search is now on for more survivors of the emerald ash borer. Photo courtesy of US Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
PHOTO: Scientists once feared Michigan had no remaining healthy ash trees like this one. However since spotting and analyzing a few, the search is now on for more survivors of the emerald ash borer. Photo courtesy of US Department of Agriculture Forest Service.
October 30, 2014

DETROIT - It's a scavenger hunt of sorts: the U.S. Forest Service is hoping Michiganders can help them find the few ash trees which have managed to survive the invasion of a deadly Asian beetle in the hopes of one day reviving the state's ash population.

Research biologist Jennifer Koch, with the Northern Research Station of the USDA Forest Service, says while more than 50 million ash trees in the upper Midwest have been killed since the emerald ash borer arrived in the U.S. about a dozen years ago, they've recently spotted a few survivors.

"We think they have a level of tolerance to emerald ash borer," Koch says. "They're not completely resistant, they still get infested, but they're definitely able to live longer in areas where all the other ash are getting killed very rapidly. "

The Forest Service has a new online reporting tool on its website where gardeners, hikers, and other wildlife enthusiasts can help identify surviving trees in southeast Michigan and northwest Ohio. Qualifying ash trees must be in natural forested areas, have a healthy canopy, and have not been treated with insecticides.

Koch says the hope is to take small limbs and cuttings from the survivors and grown them into offspring trees in greenhouses where they'll be further tested with ash borer eggs. She says the end result could help bring ash trees back to Michigan.

"Ultimately we want to breed for tolerant or resistant ash trees so we can restore all of the ash resources that we've lost in these areas," she says.

Koch adds, the study will likely expand to other parts of the state soon.

Mona Shand, Public News Service - MI