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Energy Efficiency Report: Maine Holding Steady at #16 for Energy-Efficiency

PHOTO: Maine ranks 16th in a recent national scorecard that ranks states for energy-efficiency. Credit: Wiki Media Commons.
PHOTO: Maine ranks 16th in a recent national scorecard that ranks states for energy-efficiency. Credit: Wiki Media Commons.
November 3, 2014

AUGUSTA, Maine – In a holding pattern – that's the picture of Maine in a recent national scorecard that ranks the states for energy-efficiency.

Maine ranks 16th in the state-by-state scorecard by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy.

"Last year, it was one of our most improved states for energy-efficiency,” says Annie Gilleo, a state policy research analyst with the Council. “It didn't move much in our ranking's this year, but Maine continues to generate significant energy savings through energy efficiency."

Gilleo says one way Maine could improve its ranking would be to devote more resources to natural gas efficiency programs.

Massachusetts and California rank first and second, while several states tied for third place.

Jim O'Reilly, director of public policy with the Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP), says Maine does have a law that requires utilities to capture all the energy from efficient sources that is cost effective, but the state is not maximizing the reach of that law.

"It's a great example of a place where you can have a law on the books, but unless you fully implement it and more importantly fund it, you might not necessarily see the maximum benefits of it,” O'Reilly says, “which is why you see Maine ranked the way you do, kind of in the middle of the pack when it comes to this region. "

O'Reilly adds Maine is taking a slow and cautious approach, but is generally on the right track to increase energy-efficiency.

Mike Clifford, Public News Service - ME