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PNS Daily Newscast - September 28, 2020 


The New York Times reports President Trump's tax returns show chronic losses; and will climate change make it as a topic in the first presidential debate?


2020Talks - September 28, 2020 


The New York Times obtains President Trump's tax returns, showing chronic loss and debts coming due. And Judge Amy Coney Barrett is Trump's nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Lame Duck Session Could Bring Road Fix for Michigan

PHOTO: Though Michigan's lame duck legislative session lasts just nine days, Governor Rick Snyder says getting a road funding bill to his desk before January 1 is a priority. Photo credit: M. Shand
PHOTO: Though Michigan's lame duck legislative session lasts just nine days, Governor Rick Snyder says getting a road funding bill to his desk before January 1 is a priority. Photo credit: M. Shand
November 10, 2014

LANSING, Mich. - With the election results now in, Michigan's outgoing legislators only have a handful of session days left before the end of the year, but they're still expected to tackle a very big issue: finding a funding solution for the state's deteriorating roads. Marissa Luna, new media specialist with Engage Michigan, says if lawmakers want to leave a lasting legacy for the state, improving the state's roads is one way to do it.

"Our roads are the most visual representation of what decades of disinvestment has done to Michigan, so it is critical that our elected officials find a solution to provide adequate funding," says Luna.

Michigan currently ranks lowest in per-capita spending on transportation infrastructure in the nation. It's estimated a fix for the state's roads will require between $1 billion and $2 billion, which the House and Senate have been unable to agree on.

Luna says, lawmakers who will soon be leaving office are still responsible to their constituents and she encourages Michiganders to hold them accountable.

"That's what our elected officials are here for," says Luna. "They're here to listen to our voices and they're here to listen to what we have to say, and what our priorities are, and they should be acting to demonstrate that they have our best interests at heart."

Polls have indicated most Michiganders are willing to pay more taxes in exchange for better roads. Governor Rick Snyder has proposed an increase in the gas tax and auto registration fees.

Mona Shand, Public News Service - MI