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Polls Show Strong Support for EPA Clean Power Rules

CHART: Several polls have found similar strong support for EPA clean power rules, including one done by George Mason University. Chart courtesy of George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication.
CHART: Several polls have found similar strong support for EPA clean power rules, including one done by George Mason University. Chart courtesy of George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication.
December 1, 2014

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. - A series of public-opinion polls shows pretty much the same results, with two-to-one support for the Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Power Plan, new rules aimed at slowing climate change.

The Sierra Club has just released a post-election poll done in six battleground states. Spokesperson Melissa Williams points out the results are similar to what several national polls have also found and says that's something opponents of these rules should think about.

"Large majorities of these voters support President Obama's plan to cut carbon pollution from power plants," says Williams. "This show of support is a warning, frankly, against Republican overreach."

In the proposal, states would have to reduce carbon emissions 20 percent by 2030, which puts pressure on coal-fired power plants. Opponents say the rules would raise the cost of electricity, but several polls have found Americans are willing to pay a little more to slow climate change.

The poll found about two-thirds of voters support the EPA plan in all six states and in several, even 50 percent support among Republicans.

"Support for this plan is extremely high and it includes large majorities of Independents and many Republicans," Williams says. "It's clear voters want action on this, and they support the President's plan; and that means the Senate should get behind that as well."

Williams says people clearly think this is an issue that has to be dealt with.

"Folks who think it's unnecessary are ignoring what's happening around them, our climate has changed and this is something we don't have a lot of time to wait on," she says.

Jerry Oster, Public News Service - SD