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OLCC Seeks Input on How Marijuana Law Should Work

PHOTO: On July 1, recreational use of marijuana becomes legal in Oregon. The process to create and implement regulations to sell it, however, will take about a year. Photo credit: greg346/FeaturePics.com.
PHOTO: On July 1, recreational use of marijuana becomes legal in Oregon. The process to create and implement regulations to sell it, however, will take about a year. Photo credit: greg346/FeaturePics.com.
January 8, 2015

SALEM, Ore. – A survey posted by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) asks Oregonians how they want the agency to implement the state's new law on selling marijuana for recreational use.

About 10,000 people already have shared their opinions by taking the online survey, and it's only open through Monday at marijuana.oregon.gov.

Karynn Fish, an OLCC spokeswoman, says it's a first step that requires a little bit of forethought.

"It's a brief survey, but it begins with an open-ended question about, 'What are some of your hopes and concerns around the law and how it's going to be implemented in your community?'” she says, “and then, has the ability to rank some of the priorities."

Some of those priorities include whether to restrict advertising or products that might appeal to children, or if the survey respondent thinks it's important that the owners of marijuana-related businesses be Oregon residents.

Fish says the survey results will be used to help draft the agenda for what's being called an OLCC listening tour around the state that begins later this month.

Recreational marijuana use will be legal in Oregon as of July 1, 2015, but commercial applications to sell it won't be accepted until one year from now, in January 2016.

Fish says the OLCC is looking closely at what Colorado and Washington have done so far with their marijuana regulations, but the agency is more concerned with getting local input.

"A lot of people have strong feelings about the initiative and how they want it to look in their communities,” she says. “Everyone seems to agree that we want to keep children safe, we want our communities to be safe, and we want to regulate the market in a way that limits the illegal market."

Fish adds that some of the issues that concern communities will be addressed in the Legislature.

Chris Thomas, Public News Service - OR