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Nevada State Parks Offering Passports?

PHOTO: Passports are now being offered to visitors at Nevada's many state parks in an effort to increase tourism. Photo courtesy of the Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources
PHOTO: Passports are now being offered to visitors at Nevada's many state parks in an effort to increase tourism. Photo courtesy of the Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources
January 12, 2015

CARSON CITY, Nev. – State officials are hoping that a new marketing effort using passports will boost tourism to Nevada's 23 state parks, recreation areas and historic sites.

Eric Johnson, an administrator with the Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources in the Division of State Parks, says people will have their passports stamped at each park they visit, as a regular passport is stamped in each country visited.

From Lake Tahoe to Valley of Fire State Park, Johnson says many Nevadans simply don't know about the state's many natural wonders.

"We've just noted that many people have commented that they've passed exits to state parks, but they haven't gone to the state parks, because they don't know anything about them,” he points out. “So the passport exposes people to the facilities in the park, the activities available, the history of the park."

Johnson says visiting 15 state parks and acquiring an equal amount of stamps on the passport will get that person a free one-year park permit, good at all state parks.

The passports, which also feature photos and descriptions of the parks, are available at any state park.

Johnson says there are many amazing places, but Sand Harbor at Lake Tahoe and the Valley of Fire near Las Vegas are the rock stars of state parks.

"It's a photographer's dream because the park changes with every hour of the day, as far as the light on the photograph,” he explains. “It's stark and breathtaking at the same time. It's also very famous for the petroglyphs."

Johnson says Sand Harbor and Valley of Fire each attracts upwards of 800,000 visitors per year.


Troy Wilde, Public News Service - NV