Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - August 14, 2018 


Omarosa promises more tapes, while CNN reports there are no black White House senior advisors. Also on the Tuesday rundown: North Carolina uses social media to protect the environment; and National Parks billions behind in maintenance.

Daily Newscasts

EPA Moves to Improve Oil Spill Preparedness, Response

PHOTO: The deadly Deepwater Horizon oil spill has prompted federal agencies to update their oil-spill preparation and response rules. The EPA is asking the public to weigh in on the proposal. Photo courtesy National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
PHOTO: The deadly Deepwater Horizon oil spill has prompted federal agencies to update their oil-spill preparation and response rules. The EPA is asking the public to weigh in on the proposal. Photo courtesy National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
January 14, 2015

PHOENIX - The Environmental Protection Agency is seeking input from people in Arizona and across the nation on a plan it says will improve the nation's ability to prepare for and respond to oil spills.

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, which killed 11 people and caused massive environmental damage, also prompted the feds to rethink their response rules and procedures for oil spills. Mathy Stanislaus, assistant administrator for the EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, said the agency now wants public comment on its proposal for policy changes.

"During that spill, we realized that the existing rules with respect to how we fight oil spills was outdated," he said. "For example, it did not include the best science. How do we evaluate toxicity? How do we look at short- and long-term impacts?"

Stanislaus said the EPA, U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies had to develop plans as the cleanup efforts for the Deepwater Horizon progressed because they had never responded to a spill of that magnitude. He said the updated rules, which include such details as the amount and toxicity of oil dispersants used, will create a better contingency plan for future oil spills.

"This is to ensure that the tools are available immediately," he said, "but when those tools are applied, making sure that it is the most effective, and is least impactful to the environment."

The EPA is accepting public comment on the proposed rule changes for the next 90 days.

EPA's proposed rule change is online at epa.gov.

Troy Wilde, Public News Service - AZ