Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 19, 2018 


Updates on Trump tariffs and his Supreme Court nominee. Also on the Wednesday rundown: New Hampshire in the news in a clean energy report; and doctors address the rise of AFib – a serious and sometimes invisible cardiac issue.

Daily Newscasts

Safety Net Reduces Child Poverty in West Virginia by More Than Half

PHOTO: An updated poverty calculator from the U.S. Census Bureau shows significant gains have been made in West Virginia in reducing child poverty. Photo credit: Esther Merbt/Pixabay.
PHOTO: An updated poverty calculator from the U.S. Census Bureau shows significant gains have been made in West Virginia in reducing child poverty. Photo credit: Esther Merbt/Pixabay.
February 26, 2015

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - An updated poverty calculator from the U.S. Census Bureau shows significant gains have been made in reducing child poverty in the Mountain State.

A new report released Wednesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation explains how the Supplemental Poverty Measure adjusts for cost of living and the benefits that low-income families receive through programs and tax credits.

Margie Hale, executive director of West Virginia Kids Count, says when the impact of societal safety net programs are taken into account, the percent of children living in poverty in West Virginia fell by more than half between 2011 and 2013.

"These programs have made an enormous impact," she says. "In West Virginia, our rate went from 30 to 13. That means the programs we're supporting are working and they are reducing poverty."

The official poverty measure used as the standard was developed in the 1960s. The report calls for further development of the Census Bureau tool to reflect county-level data.

Laura Speer, associate director for policy reform and advocacy at the Annie E. Casey Foundation, says the foundation is aware safety net programs aren't the only solution. The report encourages more investment in other ways known to set children on a path to success.

"Access to high-quality early education," says Speer. "Changing tax credit policies to help families keep more of what they learn. Linking up programs for parents to programs for children."

The report estimates child poverty costs the country $500 billion annually in lost productivity and earnings, including costs related to health and crime.

The entire Measuring Access to Opportunity in the United States report can be found at the Annie E. Casey Foundation website.

Dan Heyman, Public News Service - WV