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Mueller to testify in open session; migrant children returned to troubled detention center; plus ending the school-to-prison pipeline, and seeking justice for Native Americans killed at Wounded Knee.

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For Many North Dakotans, A Good Night's Sleep is Just a Dream

PHOTO: North Dakotans will lose an hour of sleep this weekend as clocks spring forward, but for many this will be just be another day in their regular struggle to get enough rest. Photo credit: reynermedia/Flickr.
PHOTO: North Dakotans will lose an hour of sleep this weekend as clocks spring forward, but for many this will be just be another day in their regular struggle to get enough rest. Photo credit: reynermedia/Flickr.
March 2, 2015

BISMARCK, N.D. – Like food, water and oxygen, sleep is one of the basics for human survival, but for many folks, getting a good night's sleep on a regular basis is little more than a dream.

It's estimated that more than a third of adults don't always get the amount of sleep they need to feel their best.

Heather Collins, clinical supervisor of the North Dakota Center for Sleep, says there can be many underlying factors.

"It can be stress-related – it can be related to health and current medical status,” she explains. “Pain is definitely a factor that for some is chronic and for others it's short-term or acute."

According to a new poll out today from the National Sleep Foundation, pain, stress and poor health all correlate to shorter sleep durations and worse sleep quality for millions of Americans.

Overall, there are about 80 different types of sleep disorders.

Collins says among the most common are insomnia, restless legs syndrome, narcolepsy and apnea, which occurs when a person's airways narrow or collapse during sleep.

"You could describe it as a little bit of a battle internally,” she explains. “Your body wants to sleep and knows it needs that rest and the brain is saying, 'Okay. Wait a minute here. I need oxygen. We need to get oxygen to the rest of the body and we need to be breathing.' So it'll wake the body up."

This is Sleep Awareness Week, and the need of many to get more sleep will be apparent on Sunday, when Daylight Saving Time begins in the U.S. and an hour is lost as clocks spring forward.


John Michaelson, Public News Service - ND