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PNS Daily Newscast - September 20, 2019 


A whistleblower complaint against President Trump sets off tug-of-war between Congress and the White House; and students around the world strike today to demand action on climate change.

2020Talks - September 20, 2019. (3 min.)  


Climate change is a big issue this election season, and global climate strikes kick off, while UAW labor strikes continue.

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Governor Celebrates Campaign to End Childhood Hunger

PHOTO: The Colorado Campaign to End Childhood Hunger has helped feed students regardless of socio-economic status through school breakfasts, after school snacks and summer meal programs. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
PHOTO: The Colorado Campaign to End Childhood Hunger has helped feed students regardless of socio-economic status through school breakfasts, after school snacks and summer meal programs. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
March 2, 2015

DENVER – There are fewer young, rumbling bellies today in Colorado than five years ago.

The Colorado Campaign to End Childhood Hunger celebrated its fifth birthday at the governor's mansion in Denver on Friday.

The campaign has worked to streamline access to food stamps and expand programs that include after-school snacks and summer meals.

Kathy Underhill, executive director of Hunger Free Colorado, says almost 27 million breakfasts were served to children in more than 1,300 participating schools last year.

"And this is really critical because we know that breakfast is the most important meal of the day,” she points out. “We're being sure that every kid in Colorado regardless of their socio-economic status is going to start the day with a full belly ready to learn."

The campaign was launched in 2009 by then Gov. Bill Ritter, and championed by Gov. John Hickenlooper.

Both issued executive orders, and they were the only governors in the nation initiating such a campaign – helping children gain access to nutritious meals.

Hickenlooper praises the success of the campaign, and says that while overall poverty rates are on the decline in Colorado, he hopes to see the work continue.

"But when you've got a 150,000 kids that are still growing up in dire poverty, you've got work to do,” he stresses. “We don't kid ourselves, we know we've got a long way to go.”

Underhill says the governors' leadership was critical to the campaign, along with broad support from local governments, foundations, faith groups, businesses and countless individuals.


Eric Galatas, Public News Service - CO