Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 16, 2018 


Ahead of his meeting with Putin, President Trump tells CBS News the European Union a foe. Also on the Monday rundown: calls in Congress to investigate women miscarrying in ICE custody: concerns over a pre-existing conditions lawsuit; and Native Americans find ways to shift negative stereotypes.

Daily Newscasts

Closet Cleaning Can Boost Illinois Communities

PHOTO: Before tossing old clothing or household items in the trash, Illinoisans are encouraged to help others in their community instead by donating those items to local charities. Photo credit: Davis Bruce J. /Flickr.
PHOTO: Before tossing old clothing or household items in the trash, Illinoisans are encouraged to help others in their community instead by donating those items to local charities. Photo credit: Davis Bruce J. /Flickr.
April 27, 2015

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – Whether it's clothing, sports equipment, toys or books, many Illinois homes are brimming with items that are rarely used, and some not at all.

Experts say taking the time to de-clutter during the spring not only helps to tidy up a home, it can also be a way to help others.

Evette Rios, a lifestyle expert and a spokeswoman for Goodwill Industries, says instead of tossing unwanted items into the trash, consider putting them into a box or bag and donating them.

"We live in this incredible country of so much abundance,” she points out. “We have so much more than we actually need. It is nice to take those times throughout the year to really clean house a little bit, and know that that stuff is actually going to create some really impactful changes in someone's life."

Rios says donating to a local charity has a positive impact on the community. For example, Goodwill works to provide employment training, job placement and other services. Sparrow House in Northern Illinois provides supportive services for homeless women and their children. And proceeds from the Salvation Army thrift stores benefit addiction recovery.

When it comes to donating, Rios says the sky's the limit. Goodwill accepts gently used clothing, furniture, electronics and many other items. She adds even things that seem too tattered or broken at first glance can often be put to good use.

"We've diverted millions and millions of pounds of textiles from landfills, by having these agreements with recycling companies that turn used items into new things that people can use," she says.


Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - IL