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Experts: Team Up to Support Kids with ADHD

PHOTO: New findings confirm the effectiveness of a team approach when treating children with ADHD, as opposed to simply medicating them. Photo credit: Mensatic/Morguefile.
PHOTO: New findings confirm the effectiveness of a team approach when treating children with ADHD, as opposed to simply medicating them. Photo credit: Mensatic/Morguefile.
April 28, 2015

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - New research suggests a team approach is best when it comes to treating kids with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

A new study from the American Academy of Pediatrics found an approach involving parents, clinicians and doctors significantly improves the impulsiveness, social skills and overall behavior of ADHD patients.

Psychologist Carla Allan says these findings confirm what many parents often say: that they want more than just medication for their ADHD-diagnosed children.

"Treatments designed to teach their children new skills, ways of managing their behavior better, ways of making and keeping friends," says Allan, "are kinds of things that parents really want for their kids to have."

The study appears in the journal Pediatrics.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about eight percent of Florida children ages four to 17 have been diagnosed with either ADHD or attention deficit disorder.

Allan says involving parents in ADHD treatment is critical, no matter what sort of intervention is used.

"Even if you're just using medication, it's dependent on the parent remembering to give the child the medicine every day, being able to get the child to take the medicine when the child maybe wants to do something else," says Allan. "It's dependent on parents being able to remember 'oh my gosh, their prescription's almost out.'"

In 2011, six percent of children in Florida were taking medication for ADHD.

Stephanie Carson, Public News Service - FL