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Start Climbing the Career Ladder at a Nevada Library

PHOTO: Studying for the GED or learning English in Nevada can usually be accomplished at no cost through the local library. Photo courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey.
PHOTO: Studying for the GED or learning English in Nevada can usually be accomplished at no cost through the local library. Photo courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey.
May 20, 2015

LAS VEGAS - People in Nevada wanting to update their literacy skills or learn to read and write English often need not look further than their local public library.

Mary Ramirez, interim manager with Computer Assisted Literacy in Libraries at the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District, says the "CALL" program, or Computer Assisted Literacy in Libraries, is helping hundreds of people each year improve their language skills and move up in their careers.

"We have individuals that get all kinds of jobs, certainly, after they've worked with our program," says Ramirez. "From entry-level positions to higher-level positions as well."

Ramirez says some English-language students may speak several other languages and in some cases are highly educated in their country of origin. She says learning English for people new to the United States can be essential for getting jobs and communicating effectively in daily life.

Ramirez says libraries also provide access for training materials for anyone studying for the GED or other high school equivalency exams. She adds, there is an abundance of services available for people who only speak English, but struggle with literacy.

"Throughout the State of Nevada, in the libraries, they have access to Web-based support materials," she says. "So that they can continue to learn as adults."

Ramirez says all programs are free for anyone with a library card.

Troy Wilde, Public News Service - NV