Newscasts

PBS Daily Newscast - July 8, 2020 


Mary Trump's book labels our president a reckless leader who paid a pal to take his SAT test; Nevada lawmakers meet to address pandemic shortfall.

2020Talks - July 8, 2020 


The Movement for Black Lives announces a new proposal to overhaul policing and invest in Black communities; NJ and DE have primary elections today; and some political candidates join in a Facebook advertising boycott.

Special Session Could Serve Up Universal School Breakfast

PHOTO: A proposal for universal school breakfast could be part of the education bill that needs to be passed in the upcoming special session of the legislature. Photo credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr.
PHOTO: A proposal for universal school breakfast could be part of the education bill that needs to be passed in the upcoming special session of the legislature. Photo credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr.
June 8, 2015

ST. PAUL, Minn. – With Minnesota lawmakers expected to reconvene this week for a special session to complete the state budget, those who help the hungry are urging approval of a measure to make sure young children are starting the day with a healthy meal.

Colleen Moriarty, executive director of Hunger Solutions Minnesota, says the proposal would provide a free school breakfast for all children up to grade three as part of the education bill.

"It was in some of the preliminary discussions for $22 million, a little less than what the governor asked for, but we're just going to have to wait and see what happens with the education bill,” she states. “But we are fiercely supportive of it."

Moriarty says despite the improved economy, there is still a great need with one in five families with children in Minnesota facing hunger or food insecurity.

While the proposal for universal school breakfast is still in limbo, a couple other bills that were passed during the regular session will provide more help to those who struggle to put food on the table.

One allows for extra buying power at farmers markets for those who use food stamps, now known as SNAP for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Moriarty says the other provides funding for mobile food shelves.

"Which will help fill gaps without establishing bricks and mortar locations for more food shelves, but bringing a mobile food shelf to people who need it and who don't have transportation,” she explains. “That bill was fully funded for $2 million. So we're very happy with that."

Statewide, there are about 9,000 visits to food shelves every day.


John Michaelson, Public News Service - MN