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PNS Daily Newscast - July 16, 2018 


Ahead of his meeting with Putin, President Trump tells CBS News the European Union a foe. Also on the Monday rundown: calls in Congress to investigate women miscarrying in ICE custody: concerns over a pre-existing conditions lawsuit; and Native Americans find ways to shift negative stereotypes.

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Poll: Wide Bipartisan and Tea Party Voter Support for Clean Water Protections

Wildlife biologist Eric Orff says Clean Water Act protections for small rivers and streams not only protect local trout but also New England's drinking water. Credit: Janice R. Orff
Wildlife biologist Eric Orff says Clean Water Act protections for small rivers and streams not only protect local trout but also New England's drinking water. Credit: Janice R. Orff
July 23, 2015

CONCORD, N.H. – A new bipartisan survey finds broad support, including from many Tea Party voters, for the Clean Water Act.

Three-in-four voters say the protections should apply to smaller rivers and streams.

The National Wildlife Federation national survey finds almost 9-in-10 registered voters say the Clean Water Act is more of a good thing than a burden.

Corey Ellis, co-chair of the New England board with Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, says the act needs to apply to smaller rivers and streams to protect the most sought after Granite State fish.

"Well, in this region, it's trout, mostly brook trout, which are extremely sensitive to having cold and clean water,” he points out. “So you can imagine, if those waters that were recently protected by the EPA weren't clean, then these fish wouldn't be able to exist."

Some members of Congress say the EPA is overstepping its authority, but the new survey finds 75 percent of registered voters see applying the act to smaller rivers and streams as more of a safeguard than a burdensome regulation.

Lori Weigel, a pollster with Public Opinion Strategies, a Republican survey company, says 49 percent of the voters it surveyed identified with the Tea Party.

Even after hearing arguments against applying Clean Water Act protections to smaller streams and wetlands, she says support was still strong across all party lines.

"It doesn't do a whole heck of a lot of good to protect and clean up and restore these larger rivers and lakes if the waters flowing into them are polluted," Weigel states.

Wildlife biologist Eric Orff says these clean water protections also protect people all across New England.

"The homes for our native brook trout, one-third of the New Hampshire population uses for water supply,” he stresses. “So, if we have cold, clear water for our fish, that means we have clean, healthy water to drink ourselves."


Mike Clifford, Public News Service - NH